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Bilbao & Tapas in our tripNETer Road Trip

28 May

We are in Bilbao!

And we have to admit that we fell completely in love!!

This amazing city of the Basque Country didn’t let us even breath: There’s so many things to do!.

Walking through El Casco Viejo is a must! Don’t forget to climb the never-ending stairs from Plaza Unamuno to Parque Etxebarria for those breathtaking views.

It is also a must, to walk along the river or ‘La Ría’. In the last 10 years, Bilbao has suffered an intense renovation, and the ‘recovery’ of the river was one of the main goals. Our mark: First class with honors.

Down the river finally you run into the symbol of the green spain capital: Guggenheim Museum.

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Spanish Gastronomy: Pescaíto Frito

23 Dec

Pescaíto Frito (fried fish) is a traditional fish dish originated during the 16th century in Spain and Portugal.The deep-frying of the fish in vegetable oil makes it crisp and light even when eaten cold, and it is a favourite dish of south spaniards.

There is a general belief that pescaito frito was possibly an inspiration for the English fish and chips.

Pescaito frito is usually eaten at chiringuitos, little restaurants at the beach, and a very popular pescaito frito chiringuito is Romerijo, at El Puerto de Santa Maria.

For a gastronomical trip, take a tripNETer mobile router with you so you can see the restaurant reviews on the way.

 

 

New Year’s Eve in Spain

10 Dec

Spanish New Year’s Eve (Nochevieja or Fin de Año) celebrations usually begin with a family dinner, traditionally including shrimp and lamb or capon. Spanish tradition says that wearing new, red underwear on New Year’s Eve brings good luck. The actual countdown is primarily followed from the clock on top of the Casa de Correos building in Puerta del Sol Square in Madrid. It is traditional to eat twelve grapes, one on each chime of the clock.

This tradition has its origins in 1909, when grape growers in Alicante thought of it as a way to cut down on the large production surplus they had had that year. Nowadays, the tradition is followed by almost every Spaniard, and the twelve grapes have become synonymous with the New Year. After the clock has finished striking twelve, people greet each other and toast with sparkling wine such as cava or champagne, or alternatively with cider.

 

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Spanish wine

28 Nov

Spanish wines are wines produced in the southwestern European country of Spain. Located on the Iberian Peninsula, Spain has over 2.9 million acres (over 1.17 million hectares) planted—making it the most widely planted wine producing nation but it is the third largest producer of wine in the world, the largest being France followed by Italy.This is due, in part, to the very low yields and wide spacing of the old vines planted on the dry, infertile soil found in many Spanish wine regions. The country is ninth in worldwide consumptions with Spaniards drinking, on average, 10.06 gallons (38 liters) a year. The country has an abundance of native grape varieties, with over 400 varieties planted throughout Spain though 80 percent of the country’s wine production is from only 20 grapes—including Tempranillo, Albariño, Garnacha, Palomino, Airen, Macabeo, Parellada, Xarel·lo, Cariñena and Monastrell.

Major Spanish wine regions include the Rioja and Ribera del Duero which is known for their Tempranillo production; Jerez, the home of the fortified wine Sherry; Rías Baixas in the northwest region of Galicia that is known for its white wines made from Albariño andCatalonia which includes the Cava and still wine producing regions of the Penedès as well the Priorat region

 

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